Owner assessed outcomes following elbow arthroscopy with or without platelet rich plasma for fragmented medial coronoid process

Regenerative Medicine

Owner assessed outcomes following elbow arthroscopy with or without platelet rich plasma for fragmented medial coronoid process

  • October 4 2023
  • Companion Studies

Published: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2022

Keyword: Dog, Platelet-rich Plasma, PRP, Elbow Arthroscopy, Fragmented Medial Coronoid Process, FMCP, Intra-articular Injection, Cartilage, Medial Compartment Disease, Subtotal Coronoidectomy, Companion Regenerative Therapies PurePRP

Author(s): A. Cruz and D. Mason

Overview   

Study objectives were to document the outcome of bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the fragmented medial coronoid process, quantify persistent lameness that required additional treatment (PRP), and document the outcomes of the dogs that received platelet-rich plasma injection when refractory to surgical treatment alone. 

Materials/Methods

115 dogs underwent arthroscopy alone and 31 dogs showing lameness or lack of improvement as perceived by the owners at least 6 weeks after arthroscopy received PRP (Companion Regenerative Therapies PurePRP). Collected data included signalment, unilateral or bilateral clinical signs, intra-articular chondroprotective injection during the procedure, if PRP intra-articular injection was received postoperatively, and if it was received, the time from the initial surgery to administration was recorded. Outcomes were assessed via standardized owner questionnaires using the Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs (LOAD) score, the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) score, and the overall quality of life (QOL) assessment.  The owner's response rate was ~50% (73 dogs). 

Results

Approximately 20% of the patients received PRP post-operatively due to persistent lameness following surgery. Similar pain scores were found between the two groups with an average of 11–13 LOAD score, 13–15 CBPI score, and good quality of life. Older animals at the time of surgery and those that received pain-relieving medications after the procedure were more painful and affected their functional outcome. PRP as an adjunctive therapy achieved a perceived good to excellent quality of life in ~90% of pets in this population.  

Conclusions

Arthroscopy and subtotal coronoidectomy followed by PRP, if needed, seemed to decrease pain, and improve lameness in the long term.  PRP should be considered as adjunctive therapy in dogs with the limited response to arthroscopy alone.